Evidence and Reasoning

Thanks,  , for sharing this great strategy for helping students to get that key component of organizing an argument of explaining the reason why the cited evidence supports the claim. I can see sharing this strategy with my middle school team, introducing it in my 6th grade class and having it be reinforced as our students move through the grades. I like the idea of also giving them lots of shared experiences to learn and get the hang of the strategy before we apply it to content.

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  • Hi  ! This is such a difficult skill to teach and I still struggle with it at times. I've found that I have to present the idea multiple ways throughout the year so that it hopefully & eventually…

  • Hello  .  I was literally just cueing up that Crash Course claim/evidence activity for next week.  The reasoning piece is definitely tricky, I agree with you (and  ) on that one!  On the…

  • I borrowed the Tom Brady example used in the track talk - my kids ate it up! However, in their recent LEQ it was clear that there was a disconnect between what was evidence vs. reasoning in actual practice…

Parents
  • I borrowed the Tom Brady example used in the track talk - my kids ate it up! However, in their recent LEQ it was clear that there was a disconnect between what was evidence vs. reasoning in actual practice of analyzing and making historical claims. Anyone have any suggestions for helping them understand this concept in practice? 

    I did use one of the Crash Course video transcripts and have them pull claim, evidence, and reasoning out of it and even here it was clear that there was a disconnect. 

  • I've been starting to break this down by leaning back into our Claim Testers from the beginning of the year. Perhaps I am using this incorrectly but I think about Logic and Evidence as follows:

    Logic is using what is in your head while evidence is something out there in the world that you can grab and use for support. I am thinking, now, that perhaps I should start to change my verbiage in class to offering 'support' and not just 'evidence' when working on writing assignments since support can more easily translate, I think, to the many different ways in which one can strengthen an argument.

    Now, of course, with this example one can then support their argument with evidence and then the 'reasoning' would be using their logic. They could also support their argument by leaning on authority or intuition and, of course, we want to use a combination of all of these to be successful. The only problem with this, though, is that every other teacher simply says 'evidence' so it would definitely be an uphill battle. Does this sound like something that could help though? I think the conversation, and framing, itself could still be helpful to nudge them in the right direction.

Reply
  • I've been starting to break this down by leaning back into our Claim Testers from the beginning of the year. Perhaps I am using this incorrectly but I think about Logic and Evidence as follows:

    Logic is using what is in your head while evidence is something out there in the world that you can grab and use for support. I am thinking, now, that perhaps I should start to change my verbiage in class to offering 'support' and not just 'evidence' when working on writing assignments since support can more easily translate, I think, to the many different ways in which one can strengthen an argument.

    Now, of course, with this example one can then support their argument with evidence and then the 'reasoning' would be using their logic. They could also support their argument by leaning on authority or intuition and, of course, we want to use a combination of all of these to be successful. The only problem with this, though, is that every other teacher simply says 'evidence' so it would definitely be an uphill battle. Does this sound like something that could help though? I think the conversation, and framing, itself could still be helpful to nudge them in the right direction.

Children
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