OC for SS After Party // Assessing Historical Thinking Live Discussion // 08-03-2022

We hope you enjoyed the rich conversation in the Assessing Historical Thinking Live Discussion. So, what’s your takeaway from this session? We’d love to hear your assessment. Post your comments and questions below. 

Top Replies

  • Clarity is essential. So is authentic communication. Thank you, all. 

  • Personal positionality activities allow students to see themselves as historical actors and individuals with different perspectives. The language we use matters (avoid "bias" and instead use "perspective…

  • It was awesome that some of the techniques that were shared came with some methods of differentiation for all levels of students

  • It was awesome that some of the techniques that were shared came with some methods of differentiation for all levels of students

  • Clarity is essential. So is authentic communication. Thank you, all. 

  • You gave good ideas on how to teach the skills of historical thinking, but nothing was really talked about how you assess it.  Do you use standards based grading? Do you have rubrics? or examples?

  • Loved all the ideas for introducing contextualization in low-stakes ways.  I want to use them all!  This was a really valuable session - is there a transcript available of the session and the chat?  I didn’t get to write down/save all the mentioned names and titles.

  • Personal positionality activities allow students to see themselves as historical actors and individuals with different perspectives. The language we use matters (avoid "bias" and instead use "perspective").

    Hatreds have context. As Historians, we are not here to simplify bad things that happen because of bad people. We need to discover the complicated and nuanced structures that create the contexts and circumstances that allow for oppression. Helps students to understand better how something horrific could happen and apply it to our own moments of oppression. The same systems of oppression are still with us today.

  • Really loved this, some of their ideas and examples of lessons they have done were wonderful. I was hoping to get more details, (ex: shared documents/tips for lessons), specifically from Carly's summer history project where students write the secondary source based on the primary sources she provides them with. Is that possible? 

  • As a Middleschool Teacher, I have come to see that our students often have extreme opinions.  They tend not to see grey areas.  And often these opinions are shaped by things outside the classroom such as social media, family beliefs, and cultural beliefs.  As much as we might strive to create an inclusive and safe learning environment sometimes such opinions come out of students in vitriolic ways.  How can we use Historical Thinking to address such thinking and thinking traps that are prevalent on social media?

  • I love the Zoom book too! I am so glad to see that referenced here; it is a great communication tool as well as context for sure! For another fun reference to help with context and point of view I use: The True Story of the Three Little Pigs: https://www.amazon.com/True-Story-Three-Little-Pigs/dp/0140544518/ref=sr_1_1?crid=30IV1BOODM8UG&keywords=the+true+story+of+the+3+little+pigs&qid=1659549661&sprefix=the+true+%2Caps%2C93&sr=8-1 It is so funny and gives another account of the fairy tale but from the Wolf's POV. And for those of you into musicals...you can always use the Wizard of Oz and Wicked as opposing viewpoints of the same event. 

    This was great; real strategies that can be used day one with our students. And I teach HS so I also really liked the grab a photo from your phone and have a partner make up a story....what a great activity!

    Can't wait to try these out and share them with others

  • I second that!  Also Anne’s photo-share lesson and political platform lesson!

  • I will ask Carly to share her sources in the discussion thread. Thanks!

Don't forget
to register!
Sign up now