A Visual Design for Evidence-Based Arguments – John Arthur

There are 5 essential pieces you need when designing a winning argument: evidence, reasoning,  your  claim, counterclaims, and personal  finishes that  make the argument your own.  It’s only 5 things, but  it’s difficult for kids to keep  them  all straight  without a picture that shows  them  how those parts are interconnected and work together.  So, I developed a simple way  of helping students visualize  the design of an argument. In this talk, I will share this design and discuss how I use it to paint a clear, memorable picture in the minds of students.

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Parents
  • This is such a great talk, I love the idea of making evidence visual. I teach Big History to Year 7 students, so Johns method appeals to me greatly. Of course I have used the sandwich or burger metaphor for an argument, I am fairly sure I was taught that model in school myself too. What I love is the layer cake visual because it puts importance on the icing which holds all the evidence together making it stronger and more presentable. I am definitely adopting this to replace my tired old burger paragraph.

    If I was going to ask you John is; Do you have a method, visual or not to recognize the elements is another persons argument? I find my students often say that they don't know what the evidence looks like. Many of them would struggle to find the icing in a augment they were presented, let alone, try and make their own.

Comment
  • This is such a great talk, I love the idea of making evidence visual. I teach Big History to Year 7 students, so Johns method appeals to me greatly. Of course I have used the sandwich or burger metaphor for an argument, I am fairly sure I was taught that model in school myself too. What I love is the layer cake visual because it puts importance on the icing which holds all the evidence together making it stronger and more presentable. I am definitely adopting this to replace my tired old burger paragraph.

    If I was going to ask you John is; Do you have a method, visual or not to recognize the elements is another persons argument? I find my students often say that they don't know what the evidence looks like. Many of them would struggle to find the icing in a augment they were presented, let alone, try and make their own.

Children