Creating Wonder in the Classroom - Emma Moss

All children ask questions—usually a ton of questions. Small children in particular wonder about almost everything. Often by the time these children become teenagers, their wonder questions, at least in the classroom, begin to decline. How can we inspire this wonder again, especially wonder about history, which we all know is fascinating stuff? One way of doing this is by designing inquiry-based lessons that encourage students to tap into their wonder.

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Parents
  • The brain is wondrous . . . and setting up inquiry is messy but so worth it! The desire for discovery is universal and allowing it to unfold in our classrooms is powerful! Thank you for sharing your process, Emma. One that works for me in my classroom is GeoInquiry: Ask, Collect, Visualize, Create, Act (or Share). Also, as a teacher of high ability thinkers we use Socratic questioning to get kids to think deeper, follow passions and take actions that make the world a better place.

Comment
  • The brain is wondrous . . . and setting up inquiry is messy but so worth it! The desire for discovery is universal and allowing it to unfold in our classrooms is powerful! Thank you for sharing your process, Emma. One that works for me in my classroom is GeoInquiry: Ask, Collect, Visualize, Create, Act (or Share). Also, as a teacher of high ability thinkers we use Socratic questioning to get kids to think deeper, follow passions and take actions that make the world a better place.

Children
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