Anonymous
Parents
  • As both a historian and librarian I really appreciate the idea of using stories to hook students prior to helping them engage with a challenging text. I think reading aloud to students, even high schoolers (thanks, Tony!), provides students with another avenue to engage with difficult vocabulary in context, not to mention natural moments to ask for content and vocab clarification. Building empathy through connecting to the human experience is something we desperately need in order to help students build civic (and other forms of) literacy. The idea of transparency is also compelling: acknowledging that a text is difficult and that students are practicing a challenge skill, as well as the idea that history is the collection of stories that our culture chooses to include. What stories do our texts tell us, and what stories are missing? These kinds of discussions can further engage students as they explore challenging materials.  #MCHE

Comment
  • As both a historian and librarian I really appreciate the idea of using stories to hook students prior to helping them engage with a challenging text. I think reading aloud to students, even high schoolers (thanks, Tony!), provides students with another avenue to engage with difficult vocabulary in context, not to mention natural moments to ask for content and vocab clarification. Building empathy through connecting to the human experience is something we desperately need in order to help students build civic (and other forms of) literacy. The idea of transparency is also compelling: acknowledging that a text is difficult and that students are practicing a challenge skill, as well as the idea that history is the collection of stories that our culture chooses to include. What stories do our texts tell us, and what stories are missing? These kinds of discussions can further engage students as they explore challenging materials.  #MCHE

Children