History Just Keeps Getting Longer - Rachel Hansen

This year we have more history to teach than last year. It just keeps getting longer! That doesn’t mean we should teach less of it. When students learn to scale shift, history will become more meaningful and relevant as they begin to contextualize their place in the narrative.

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  • Former Member
    Former Member 8 months ago

    Teaching scale, and scale switching, is so important in a history classroom! I recently taught the first few days of the course with scale by modifying the Human History on a String activity to something that students could do on paper (we were in person, but attempting not to have students get too close to one another, but this modification would also make it work remotely). Basically, students did the math to create a Big History and Human History timeline on a "ruler" (it was super not to scale once I copied the image onto a page though!). Right before this, they wrote the "history of me," and then we discussed after. If anyone wants the document just let me know--I just don't have the files on this machine right now!

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  • Former Member
    Former Member 8 months ago

    Teaching scale, and scale switching, is so important in a history classroom! I recently taught the first few days of the course with scale by modifying the Human History on a String activity to something that students could do on paper (we were in person, but attempting not to have students get too close to one another, but this modification would also make it work remotely). Basically, students did the math to create a Big History and Human History timeline on a "ruler" (it was super not to scale once I copied the image onto a page though!). Right before this, they wrote the "history of me," and then we discussed after. If anyone wants the document just let me know--I just don't have the files on this machine right now!

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