History Just Keeps Getting Longer - Rachel Hansen

This year we have more history to teach than last year. It just keeps getting longer! That doesn’t mean we should teach less of it. When students learn to scale shift, history will become more meaningful and relevant as they begin to contextualize their place in the narrative.

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Parents
  • Rachel I am impressed with how well you explain the concept of scale switching in both geographic and temporal frames. Students often struggle at first to understand how the BHP narrative connects to them.  When using the example of scale shifting to tell a personal story helps students to think about their own history, which they are familiar with, and allows them to apply that understanding to the larger BHP narrative, which they are often unfamiliar with.  I really liked starting the year last year having students write their own personal timeline.  I had them complete one at the opening of class during the first week.  Then I shared with them my timeline which reached back before I was born.  The students quickly realized they did not include anything before their birth.  This realization opened the door to have a conversation about scale and the need to reach beyond an event to understand the context for its occurrence. I then had students remake their timelines to include this concept of scale.  

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  • Rachel I am impressed with how well you explain the concept of scale switching in both geographic and temporal frames. Students often struggle at first to understand how the BHP narrative connects to them.  When using the example of scale shifting to tell a personal story helps students to think about their own history, which they are familiar with, and allows them to apply that understanding to the larger BHP narrative, which they are often unfamiliar with.  I really liked starting the year last year having students write their own personal timeline.  I had them complete one at the opening of class during the first week.  Then I shared with them my timeline which reached back before I was born.  The students quickly realized they did not include anything before their birth.  This realization opened the door to have a conversation about scale and the need to reach beyond an event to understand the context for its occurrence. I then had students remake their timelines to include this concept of scale.  

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