Democracy in Crisis: Is It Our Fault? - Amit Kobrowski

This is a golden age for social studies. Despite Common Core and STEM casting us as irrelevant, events have proven that we do not need a test to prove our worth. Far from being about memorizing facts and dates, our subject remains central to the American Project. Seeking to understand what is happening at the ballot box, in the courts, or on the streets, Americans turn to our subject. What our students explore, investigate, and learn about US History creates a shared understanding of who and what we are as a nation. We need to embrace this responsibility.

Anonymous
Parents
  •  thank you for putting together such a thought provoking talk. All three of my courses (WHP/BHP/US History) start with some type of historiography. We hammer home idea of the Dangers of a Single story and the need for complex narrative. But after I shared an excerpt of James Loewen's Lies last week before the holiday, I feel like I need to do more. The closing paragraph of the Thanksgiving chapter says that the 'antidote to feel good history is not feel bad history.' I had students speak candidly about how they previously disengaged from tough conversations because they felt guilty or were even offended as we deconstructed popular mythical figures that they identified with like Columbus. The excerpts from Lies was sort of like a 'aha' moment for them-- even though cancel culture exists in their popular culture schema it doesn't when we're 'doing history.' We study the good, the bad, and the ugly. There are still tougher conversations that we have yet to get to. What would you tell your student if they asked about why POTUS wants to fund a 'patriotic curriculum' or a National Garden of American heroes? How would you call in students when call out culture is all the rage? 

Comment
  •  thank you for putting together such a thought provoking talk. All three of my courses (WHP/BHP/US History) start with some type of historiography. We hammer home idea of the Dangers of a Single story and the need for complex narrative. But after I shared an excerpt of James Loewen's Lies last week before the holiday, I feel like I need to do more. The closing paragraph of the Thanksgiving chapter says that the 'antidote to feel good history is not feel bad history.' I had students speak candidly about how they previously disengaged from tough conversations because they felt guilty or were even offended as we deconstructed popular mythical figures that they identified with like Columbus. The excerpts from Lies was sort of like a 'aha' moment for them-- even though cancel culture exists in their popular culture schema it doesn't when we're 'doing history.' We study the good, the bad, and the ugly. There are still tougher conversations that we have yet to get to. What would you tell your student if they asked about why POTUS wants to fund a 'patriotic curriculum' or a National Garden of American heroes? How would you call in students when call out culture is all the rage? 

Children