A Visual Design for Evidence-Based Arguments – John Arthur

There are 5 essential pieces you need when designing a winning argument: evidence, reasoning,  your  claim, counterclaims, and personal  finishes that  make the argument your own.  It’s only 5 things, but  it’s difficult for kids to keep  them  all straight  without a picture that shows  them  how those parts are interconnected and work together.  So, I developed a simple way  of helping students visualize  the design of an argument. In this talk, I will share this design and discuss how I use it to paint a clear, memorable picture in the minds of students.

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Parents
  • What I found interesting here was how the visual was a creative whole and not a sequence. I use the concept of an "evidence sandwich"  to show how the claim, the lead-in phrase, the quote, the explanation, the connection back to the claim must all be "sandwiched" into nuggets each time you insert them into your arguments.

    But what John did was use the layers of the cake to show how evidence must be layered to create a complex and compelling argument. The frosting is the connective mechanisms of the writing. and the decorations are what makes each writer's unique style show through. It's not prescriptive, but it shows how all the parts fit together.

    Do any of you have some sort of visual metaphor you use to help students write? Do you think you might adopt John's?

Comment
  • What I found interesting here was how the visual was a creative whole and not a sequence. I use the concept of an "evidence sandwich"  to show how the claim, the lead-in phrase, the quote, the explanation, the connection back to the claim must all be "sandwiched" into nuggets each time you insert them into your arguments.

    But what John did was use the layers of the cake to show how evidence must be layered to create a complex and compelling argument. The frosting is the connective mechanisms of the writing. and the decorations are what makes each writer's unique style show through. It's not prescriptive, but it shows how all the parts fit together.

    Do any of you have some sort of visual metaphor you use to help students write? Do you think you might adopt John's?

Children