A Visual Design for Evidence-Based Arguments – John Arthur

There are 5 essential pieces you need when designing a winning argument: evidence, reasoning,  your  claim, counterclaims, and personal  finishes that  make the argument your own.  It’s only 5 things, but  it’s difficult for kids to keep  them  all straight  without a picture that shows  them  how those parts are interconnected and work together.  So, I developed a simple way  of helping students visualize  the design of an argument. In this talk, I will share this design and discuss how I use it to paint a clear, memorable picture in the minds of students.

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Parents
  • Finally got some time to sit down and watch, thanks John! I took a screen shot of the finished cake and am attaching it here for any who need it. Felt the visual is a powerful one. Putting historical thinking or writing skills in a students langauge is so important, one I often struggle with. So this whole thing was full of amazing examples of just that. It made me think about giving kids cues related to types of evidence (i.e. to get them to analyze their own work in terms of quantitative and qualitative aspects in their writing). Like Ben said previously, our kids can harvest quotes and statistics but struggle to comment on them. Don't have a question at the moment, but wanted to say thanks! I couldn't attach the image for some reason but here is a link to our department twitter where I shared it with shout outs! https://twitter.com/MtSiHistorians/status/1306577220496838656?s=20

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  • Finally got some time to sit down and watch, thanks John! I took a screen shot of the finished cake and am attaching it here for any who need it. Felt the visual is a powerful one. Putting historical thinking or writing skills in a students langauge is so important, one I often struggle with. So this whole thing was full of amazing examples of just that. It made me think about giving kids cues related to types of evidence (i.e. to get them to analyze their own work in terms of quantitative and qualitative aspects in their writing). Like Ben said previously, our kids can harvest quotes and statistics but struggle to comment on them. Don't have a question at the moment, but wanted to say thanks! I couldn't attach the image for some reason but here is a link to our department twitter where I shared it with shout outs! https://twitter.com/MtSiHistorians/status/1306577220496838656?s=20

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