Democracy in Crisis: Is It Our Fault? - Amit Kobrowski

This is a golden age for social studies. Despite Common Core and STEM casting us as irrelevant, events have proven that we do not need a test to prove our worth. Far from being about memorizing facts and dates, our subject remains central to the American Project. Seeking to understand what is happening at the ballot box, in the courts, or on the streets, Americans turn to our subject. What our students explore, investigate, and learn about US History creates a shared understanding of who and what we are as a nation. We need to embrace this responsibility.

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Parents
  • Students appear to be more engaged because they feel like what is happening in America relates to them and some of them have been involved in protests and marches which has given them some first hand experiences I can't replicate in the classroom. I think about your question Is it our fault? I don't know if it is our fault but I know my students want to play a part in fixing it and they expect others to want to as well otherwise they see them as the opposition. Do you think that sort of approach will result in lasting positive change? 

Comment
  • Students appear to be more engaged because they feel like what is happening in America relates to them and some of them have been involved in protests and marches which has given them some first hand experiences I can't replicate in the classroom. I think about your question Is it our fault? I don't know if it is our fault but I know my students want to play a part in fixing it and they expect others to want to as well otherwise they see them as the opposition. Do you think that sort of approach will result in lasting positive change? 

Children