Can Conceptual/Thematic allow for deeper understanding while also addressing time constraints?

Vicki Lisle's talk, "DOES HISTORY HAVE TO BE CHRONOLOGICAL?: CREATING OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENT INQUIRY WITH CONCEPTUAL UNITS", makes me wonder if we can help students experience history more deeply and help to reduce the pressure of trying to get through so many years of World History?  It also has me thinking about how the Frames presented in WHP could serve as thematic frames and become units that break away from the chronological approach to studying World History. I have always liked the idea of teaching thematically but it has not been an easy sell to colleagues when discussing curriculum revisions. 

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  • Less is more! Trying to teach a broad survey course of the entirety of world history is daunting, to say the least. I like you're idea of using the frames from WHP as thematic units. However, I think…

  • Less is more! Trying to teach a broad survey course of the entirety of world history is daunting, to say the least. I like you're idea of using the frames from WHP as thematic units. However, I think one thing that makes frames so compelling as an instructional tool is the way that students can begin to connect themes across chronological time periods. 

    I'm curious to see what kinds of themes each of the state social studies standards emphasizes. What thematic units would take top priority if you could design your ideal world history thematic course?